tigerhazard:

jamdoughnutmagician:

there is not one search term here that isn’t magical

i know ive reblogged this before at least twice but i decided to read through the entire thing this time and im in pain from how hard i am laughing please forgive me

hythmknwy:


Apparently, of the 4.6 million who played the Destiny Beta, feedback showed that one of the most requested things was something the developers at Bungie didn’t expect — beards. In fact, the demand for facial hair reached such a height that it has reportedly caused a “heated internal dialogue” at Bungie.
Jonty Barnes, production director at Bungie, said that “prototyped beards for Destiny at one stage of development, but this customization option was never a priority”. He went on to say that beards are now being deeply considered in light of the Beta feedback: ”I don’t know when you’re going to have beards, but I’m pretty sure by the end of time there will be plenty of beards in Destiny”.

Read it here

hythmknwy:

Apparently, of the 4.6 million who played the Destiny Beta, feedback showed that one of the most requested things was something the developers at Bungie didn’t expect — beards. In fact, the demand for facial hair reached such a height that it has reportedly caused a “heated internal dialogue” at Bungie.

Jonty Barnes, production director at Bungie, said that “prototyped beards for Destiny at one stage of development, but this customization option was never a priority”. He went on to say that beards are now being deeply considered in light of the Beta feedback: ”I don’t know when you’re going to have beards, but I’m pretty sure by the end of time there will be plenty of beards in Destiny”.

Read it here

mercurykiss:

gentlemanbones:

camerapits:

themiracleofmusic:

oh.

Actually, I think the kid is playing Minecraft. Which is essentially digital Legos.
Two generations of creative people, just different methods of expression. Let’s not shit on the digital age as much, ‘eh?

You know what’s great about Minecraft?
You don’t get lacerations from stepping on it.

You know what’s great about legos?Your shit doesn’t get blown up because a green penis snuck up on you.

mercurykiss:

gentlemanbones:

camerapits:

themiracleofmusic:

oh.

Actually, I think the kid is playing Minecraft. Which is essentially digital Legos.

Two generations of creative people, just different methods of expression. Let’s not shit on the digital age as much, ‘eh?

You know what’s great about Minecraft?

You don’t get lacerations from stepping on it.

You know what’s great about legos?

Your shit doesn’t get blown up because a green penis snuck up on you.

"The self-sacrifice of the militant or the activist is mirrored in their power over others as an expert - like a religion there is a kind of hierarchy of suffering and self-righteousness. The activist assumes power over others by virtue of her greater degree of suffering (‘non-hierarchical’ activist groups in fact form a ‘dictatorship of the most committed’). The activist uses moral coercion and guilt to wield power over others less experienced in the theology of suffering."
tagged → #sociology #culture
skindancer:

holy shit i did not mean to do a vanishing act but anyway here’s wonderwall
(actually it’s a quick sera though)

skindancer:

holy shit i did not mean to do a vanishing act but anyway here’s wonderwall

(actually it’s a quick sera though)

tagged → #dragon age
tagged → #or plays the bass!

eternalecho:

A man c h o o s e s.  [A slave o b e y s]

tagged → #bioshock

foundbysara:

"He has autism. I’m really surprised he was playing with you."

This happens sometimes at work, and I’m never sure how to react. A parent (or other adult) will come up to me after I’ve been playing with their child, and point out that the child’s current behavior is really unusual for them.

Sometimes it’s young kids who just seem overwhelmed by their surroundings, and we’ll just sit together for a little bit. I’ll talk about things—their shoes, the weather, the character on their shirt—for little while, and then listen when they start talking. If they start talking—often, they don’t,and that’s okay.

Sometimes it’s a copycat game. They’ll hide from me, and I’ll hide from them. They peek out, and I peek out. They put their hands up, and I put my hands up. When they realize that everything I do is copying them, their actions get more intentional, silly, fun.

Last week there was a young man in our new Thomas the Tank Engine gallery. I talked with him for a minute, and it was immediately clear that he a.) loved trains, and b.) hated eye contact. So I stopped trying to make eye contact, and we played in parallel, not facing each other, but talking about trains, Thomas, the toys he had at home.

And it happened again, the grown-up coming up afterwards and confessing “He’s autistic, he doesn’t usually talk to people.”

And I smiled and said, “Well, it seems like he’s having fun,” because I didn’t know what else to say. And it did seem that way, and that’s great.

But I never know how to react when parents say that to me. They always seem pleased, grateful, even, and I guess they must mean it as a compliment. And if I made their day brighter, and (more importantly) their child’s day brighter, good. That’s wonderful, and it’s what I try to do with everyone who comes to the museum.

But it’s also weird, because—it’s what I do with everyone who comes to the museum. I’m not a therapist, I’m not a specialist, I’m not some mysterious Autism Whisperer. I just try to connect with kids and make their days better. I don’t have special tactics for “dealing with” autistic kids. I don’t even work in an environment where autistic kids are identified as such, except by their parents, after the fact.

So I’m literally treating these children as I would any other human: with cheer, and with kindness, with gentleness, silliness, understanding.

So when the adult says to me, “he never plays this way!” I worry.

Because I am not an extraordinary person. I am not doing anything special—just paying attention to the child, offering lighthearted interaction, responding to their needs and desires as best as I understand them. It’s how I approach every child I work with—hell, it’s how I try to approach every person I know.

So when I hear, “He never plays like this!”

I don’t really know what to say. But I hope with all my heart that its not because he’s never treated like this.

zeekubeast:

wanting to draw things but not having the energy to put effort into drawings

image

"Why do white people own so many pets?
Because we’re not allowed to own people anymore.
*****
What is the scariest thing about a white person in prison?
You know he did it.
*****
how many Chicago cops does it take to change a light bulb? None, they just beat the room for being black.”
*****
A good looking 50 year old white man is trying to get laid on reality TV. What show are you watching?
To catch a predator.
*****
Why do white girls travel in groups of three or five?
They can’t even
*****
What do you call 64 white people in a room? A full blooded Cherokee."

from various reddit threads

at dinner last night, a coworker was talking about hanging out with his white friends and getting fed up with the racist jokes, and asked them to tell a white people joke.  nobody had any, so he googled and found these. after a few of them, people were a lot less comfortable.

white folks, next time you hear a racist joke, maybe lead with one of these in response.  tag this “I’m white” when you reblog it, if you are.

(via cuterpillar)

tagged → #i'm white #this is cool